Participants

Human mobility

kgKarl-Göran Sjögren, Senior researcher, Associate Professor in Archaeology University of Gothenburgh, Sweden, is born 1949, and has a BA from 1949, Ph.D. in archaeology from the University of Gothenburg from 2003 (”Mångfalldige uhrminnes grafvar….”. Megaliter och samhälle i Västsverige). He became an associate professor 2008. His main interest are megalithic monuments, Stone Age archaeology focusing on social transformation, but also the integration of science and databased methodology into archaeology (GIS, statistcs, isotops analysis etc).

 

 

T. Douglas Price (PhD 1975 University of Michigan) was Weinstein Professor of European Archaeology, Emeritus, and Director of the Laboratory for Archaeological Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he has served on the faculty for more than 35 years. He is currently an honorary professor in the Department of Prehistory at the University of Aarhus. His field research has involved the investigation of the beginnings of agriculture on the island of Zealand, Denmark. A second area of interest involves archaeological chemistry and the use of isotopes in human tooth enamel to examine questions of prehistoric mobility. Major projects along these lines are focused in Central America, the North Atlantic, North America, China, and Europe. The Laboratory for Archaeological Chemistry is also involved in the chemical analysis of ceramics, bone, soils, and other archaeological materials. He is the author or editor of more than 170 articles and 15 books, the most recent of which include Pathways to Power (with Gary Feinman, 2010), Introduction to Archaeological Chemistry (with James H. Burton, 2010), The Origins of Agriculture: New Data, New Ideas (with Ofer Bar-Yosef, 2011), Images of the Past 7e (with Gary Feinman, 2012), and Europe Before Rome (2012).

Eske Willerslev is director of Centre of Excellence in GeoGenetics and the National CryoBank and Sequencing Facility, situated at the National History Museum and the Biological Institute, University of Copenhagen. During his PhD, he established the first ancient DNA facility in Denmark, which, despite its small size, rapidly became internationally recognized for, among other things, establishing the fields of ancient sedimentary and ice core genetics, which have since become world-wide scientific disciplines. His research interests include: palaeoecology, palaeontology, archaeology, domestication, climatology, ancient microbial biology, DNA degradation and repair, exobiology, phylogenetics, molecular evolution, barcoding, and genomics. He has strong collaborations with world leading scientists in Europe, US, Canada, and Russia, and participated in 12 international polar expeditions, 5 of which he led.

Morten Allentoft is an evolutionary biologist with a MSc from Copenhagen University (Denmark) and a PhD from University of Canterbury (New Zealand). He specialises in applying ancient DNA technology to study population genetics of both extinct and contemporary species. He is currently employed as a post doc (Marie Curie fellow) at Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark. His research here is focused on the genetics of ancient European humans, involving a large number of samples from the Stone Age and Bronze Age.

Morten Allentoft publications
Tom Gilbert

Molecular anthropologist

Copenhagen

 

Torbjörn Ahlström

Associate Professor

Osteologist

 

Lise Harvig

Lise Harvig has an MA in Archaeology from the University of Copenhagen. She is finishing her PhD in 2013 from the University of Copenhagen (Department of Biological Anthropology, Institute of Forensic Medicine) working with an interdisciplinary project with the title Cremation in a bioarchaeological perspectives – from excavation and analysis to concepts of death, rite and praxis. In her PhD she primarily focuses on cremated human remains from Bronze Age Denmark using CT-scanning of cremation urns as a new method. However, she also works with skeletal remains from all periods of the prehistory and the modern periods.

Anna TornbergAnna Tornberg, MA in archaeology, BA in Historical Osteology, Lund University. Graduate Student in Historical Osteology at Lund University since September 2011. In her thesis she is using both osteological and biochemical approaches to examine human diet and physical health in skeletal assemblages from the South Swedish Late Neolithic-Early Bronze Age. A special focus is on the bioarchaeological consequences of an agricultural intensification and the Secondary Products Revolution.

Born in Argentine, Karin M. Frei has lived in Spain, and Denmark. She has an M.Sc. in Geology and Geochemistry from the University of Copenhagen. She received her PhD in 2010 from the University of Copenhagen (Department of Prehistoric Archaeology, SAXO Institute) for an innovative cross-disciplinary project with the title Provenance studies of Pre-Roman Iron Age textiles –methods, development and applications. Here she developed a method which allows for an isotope-geochemical characterization of the raw material of ancient textiles. She was awarded with the international prize for the best PhD in Archaeometry in 2011 in the University of Liege, Belgium by the Groupe des Méthodes Pluridisciplinaires Contribuant à l’Archéologie (GMPCA).  In 2012 she was awarded the For Women In Science prize by L’Oréal Denmark and UNESCO at the Danish Royal Academy of Science. She works with strontium isotope analyses in archaeology on human and animal material as well as other organic archaeological material such as textiles and wood. Her interests lies therefore in mobility throughout prehistory.

Łukasz Pospieszny, received his Ph.D. in archaeology in 2012 from the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland. His investigation of the burial rituals of the later Neolithic and Early Bronze Age societies of the Polish Lowland was financed by a research grant of the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education. He held M.A. and Ph.D. student trainee positions at the universities of Aarhus and Gothenburg, funded by the Danish Government Scholarships for Foreign Nationals, Kazimierz Salewicz og Hustru Marit Jensens Studiefond and the Visby Program – Swedish Institute Baltic Sea Region Exchange Program. His interest lies in socio-economic transformations of Central Europe and Southern Scandinavia from the Middle Neolithic to the Middle Bronze Age. Author of the book Mortuary practices of the Corded Ware culture societies in Greater Poland and Cuiavia (2009, in Polish). A second area of his interest involves archaeological geophysics, especially magnetometry. Co-researcher in the fieldwork projects in Hungary (Landscapes Of Complexity: The Politics Of Social, Economic & Ritual Transformations In Bronze Age Hungary, financed by The Wenner-Gren Foundation), Greece (Anthemoundas Valley Archaeological Project, financed by Polish National Science Centre) and Romania (Ein funeraler Kultbau der späten Bronzezeit aus Lăpuş, Nordwestrumänien, und sein kultureller Kontext, financed by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft).

Research collaborators: Toomas Kivisild (Cambridge), Richard Villems (Estonian Biocentre), and in Denmark the National Museum/keeper Poul Otto Nielsen, Niels Lynnerup, the Anthropological Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, Copenhagen.

In Poland: Janusz Czebreszuk. In Germany: Gisela Grupe and George McGlynn (curator of anthropological collections in Munich).

Bronze age textiles

Karin M. Frei The Danish National Research Foundation´s Centre for Textile Research and national Museum of Denmark. She received her PhD in 2010 from the University of Copenhagen (Department of Prehistoric Archaeology, SAXO Institute) for an innovative cross-disciplinary project with the title Provenance studies of Pre-Roman Iron Age textiles –methods, development and applications. Here she developed a method which allows for an isotope-geochemical characterization of the raw material of ancient textiles. She was awarded with the international prize for the best PhD in Archaeometry in 2011 in the University of Liege, Belgium by the Groupe des Méthodes Pluridisciplinaires Contribuant à l’Archéologie (GMPCA).  In 2012 she was awarded the For Women In Science prize by L’Oréal Denmark and UNESCO at the Danish Royal Academy of Science. She works with strontium isotope analyses in archaeology. Her interests lies therefore in mobility throughout prehistory.

 

Serena Sabatini

Ph.D. in Archaeology

University of Gothenburg.

 

Sophie Bergerbrant, Ph.D. in Archaeology, she completed her thesis 2007 at the University of Stockholm. She is an experienced editor, has edited one volume containing 57 articles and has worked as technical editor for the Journal JONAS (Journal of Nordic Archaeological Science). On top of that she has experiences of peer-reviewing articles. Her research speciality is textile and the Bronze Age of Northern Europe. She collaborates with Lena Hammarlund, an experienced hand-weaver, in order to understand the practical side of the textile craft. Part of this collaboration is the creation of a cloak that will be as close as possible to a Bronze Age cloak, from fibre preparation to weaving.

Research collaborations: the National Museum/keeper Poul Otto Nielsen, & the Danish Centre for Isotope Geology at the Geographical & Geological Institute, Copenhagen University.

A collaboration between Gothenburg University & the Danish National Research Foundation’s Centre for Textile Research.

Copper production

Lene Melheim, Postdoc, University of Gothenburg. Her main focus within the project is the metalwork of the 2nd millennium BC. The approach embraces technological transmission, the provenance of the raw materials and metal circulation. Previous research includes Bronze Age cosmology, ritual practice, myths and metallurgy. She did her PhD at the University of Oslo. In the thesis: Recycling Ideas. Bronze Age Metal Production in Southern Norway (2012), she explored the adoption of copper and bronze metallurgy in southern Norway in the late 3rd and 2nd millennium BC. The hypothesis of indigenous copper production on the Scandinavian Peninsula which was developed in her Ph.D. thesis will be pursued further within the scope of the Rise.

In collaboration with the department of geo-science, Oslo and the isotrace laboratory, Oxford.

Travels, transmissions & transformation

Kristian Kristiansen is the leader of the research project. His main research is on the Bronze Age, but central research interest are also archaeological theory and archaeological heritage. In many books he has promoted a European perspective on the Bronze Age (see below), whereas in his archaeological excavations he concentrated on local areas in Sicily, Hungary and Denmark/Sweden (see below). Throughout his career he has succeeded in achieving both national and international funding, for example, the Marie Curie project: Forging Identities (homepage:www.forging-identities.com), which explores the movement of people, things, animals and ideas in Bronze Age Europe. Another project is the creation of a Research Institute for Rock Art (homepage:www.shfa.se ), making primary documentation of rock art accessible to the public. He is also engaged in an interdisicplinary collaboration at University of Gothenburg, called: The Heritage Academy’ to promote research and teaching on cultural heritage. Further information at www.academia.edu

kristian.kristiansen@archaeology.gu.se

Niels N. Johannsen

 

University of Aarhus.